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Everlasting Star Community _ General discussion _ Where Was Arthur Miller ?

Posted by: mel76 Aug 15 2006, 06:53 PM

pourquoi arthur miller n'a pas assist l'enterrement de Marilyn?

Posted by: Paju Aug 15 2006, 07:04 PM

I think the question was why didn't Arthur Miller help with Marilyn's funeral arrangements (am I right)?
Please try to write in English, or if you feel you must write in French please add an English translation. Not everybody here speaks French.
To answer your question, if I understood it correctly, Arthur Miller did receive information about Marilyn's death and I believe he was invited to the funeral, but he simply couldn't go. He couldn't believe Marilyn was dead, it was simply a horrible, impossible thought for him, so he couldn't force himself to go. He couldn't make himself face the fact that Marilyn had died. Joe DiMaggio and Berniece Miracle took care of the funeral arrangements. I don't think Arthur Miller was even in California at that time.

Posted by: mel76 Aug 15 2006, 08:23 PM

ok thanks Paju !!and sorry but i dont speak english very well and I thought there was a translator on this site but no...

Posted by: Lauren Michele Aug 15 2006, 11:40 PM

I was thinking how it must have been such a horrendous shock to those around Marilyn, especially those very close to her when she died. The tape that shows Joe walking beside her casket my gosh he looked like a zombie. I didn' t know Arthur was unable to go because of such grief. They weren't divorced for very long .

Posted by: meztisa Aug 19 2006, 06:52 PM

QUOTE(Lauren Michele @ Aug 15 2006, 06:40 PM) [snapback]112105[/snapback]
I was thinking how it must have been such a horrendous shock to those around Marilyn, especially those very close to her when she died. The tape that shows Joe walking beside her casket my gosh he looked like a zombie. I didn' t know Arthur was unable to go because of such grief. They weren't divorced for very long .


I always thought Joe Dimaggio took her death even harder. I mean, she was the last thought in his mind before he died. I always had the impression that he loved more than Arthur did. no.gif

Posted by: Tara Aug 19 2006, 07:26 PM

By the time Marilyn died, she and Arthur were not in love anymore, and he had remarried, but he still was affected by Marilyn's death as Paju said. But, his feelings were raw and he could not face going to a funeral, with the press there especially. We all respond to bereavement in personal and unexpected ways, and Arthur often seemed to be a man who wasn't comfortable with showing his feelings in public. Also, his new wife was due to give birth imminently in New York, and he probably didn't want his older kids to go through a very public funeral in LA. So perhaps it was better for him to stay away.

Whereas Joe, I think, was still in love with Marilyn - and always had been. They were very close before she died, according to most accounts. That's why it was natural that Joe would take care of the funeral arrangements, and why this usually reserved man expressed his grief so openly - because he had lost the love of his life. That's how I see it anyway.

Posted by: Lauren Michele Aug 19 2006, 08:49 PM

It's very surprising to learn that Joe allowed Arthur 'to go. Arthur had a choice. I can see very much in most if not all of the photos of Arthur, you're so right Tara, that Arthur did seem like a person who did not want to show emotion. I say Joe "allowed" Arthur because I always believed that Joe took over the funeral arrangements? ...Lauren M.

Posted by: Tara Aug 19 2006, 08:56 PM

It was Joe who claimed Marilyn's body, and he arranged the funeral with Berniece and Inez Melson. Arthur was not involved, but Joe invited him. Joe showed his strength of character in doing that, and never tried to shut Arthur out. Arthur's decision not to go was his own.

Posted by: Charli Aug 19 2006, 10:45 PM

I once read an article on Arthur Miller, and it says that his wife was 9 months pregnant...naturally, I don't think he would want to leave his wife during this time.
I think the baby was born on August 8 (or August 6th)

Guys, Arthur wasn't a very emotional person...he left his brain damaged son in an institution for the rest of his life and never, not once visited him.

Posted by: Robby Aug 19 2006, 11:10 PM

How could Arthur be so heartless!

Posted by: Lauren Michele Aug 20 2006, 05:09 AM

QUOTE(Charli @ Aug 19 2006, 10:45 PM) [snapback]112526[/snapback]
I once read an article on Arthur Miller, and it says that his wife was 9 months pregnant...naturally, I don't think he would want to leave his wife during this time.
I think the baby was born on August 8 (or August 6th)

Guys, Arthur wasn't a very emotional person...he left his brain damaged son in an institution for the rest of his life and never, not once visited him.


Charli, how sad.

Posted by: Lauren Michele Aug 20 2006, 07:53 AM

QUOTE(meztisa @ Aug 19 2006, 06:52 PM) [snapback]112511[/snapback]
I always thought Joe Dimaggio took her death even harder. I mean, she was the last thought in his mind before he died. I always had the impression that he loved more than Arthur did. no.gif


Hi Felicia. I can't help but agree with you with the fact that Joe loved Marilyn undoubtfully more than probably any other man had ever loved her. He looked lost at the funeral. In shock. no.gif LaurenM.

Posted by: Tara Aug 20 2006, 11:09 AM

I'm not trying to excuse Arthur's actions towards his son, but I'm not going to judge him either. He was very much a man of his time in that he couldn't express his emotions that well, except in his writing. In those days, there was a stigma attached to brain-damaged children. They were not encouraged to be part of the community as happens today. It's very sad. Arthur was a very intelligent man who had a lot of integrity, but in his personal life he was as flawed as the next man.

Fortunately, Inge was always a good mother to their son. She visited him twice a week and loved and cared for him just as much as her other children, despite the difficult circumstances. Inge was a wonderful woman and I think Arthur was very lucky to meet her when he did.

Posted by: Lauren Michele Aug 20 2006, 03:02 PM

Bless Inge. Not to drag this to death, but, there are alot of fathers i've seen in my life who have the capacity to put their child to the side or how can i say it, leave them behind and continue to go on and be a productive member of society. I know this because my own father did this. I may have mentioned this before that my father left and abandoned my 3 year old brother and I back in 1973. He went on and still goes on living today. People have told me that they wonder how the hell he can go on the way he does. Like for instance aunts and uncles. In order to function in life, my father i believe, had to block my brother and myself completely out. Maybe that's what Arthur had to do.

Posted by: Young Aug 21 2006, 04:04 AM

Wow, Lauren. The same thing happened with my father. He chose not to acknowledge my sister and I as his children. He's alive and well; I haven't seen him in seven years.

Posted by: Lauren Michele Aug 21 2006, 04:37 AM

QUOTE(Young @ Aug 21 2006, 04:04 AM) [snapback]112654[/snapback]
Wow, Lauren. The same thing happened with my father. He chose not to acknowledge my sister and I as his children. He's alive and well; I haven't seen him in seven years.



I am so sorry to hear that young. I think it's fair to say i know how you may feel. I grew up very insecure, and very angry deep inside. Counseling would have been great back then but we didn't go. As an adult, at my age now, i still hurt deep inside and feel a sense of rejection. throb.gif I hope you never take it personal about what your father did. Thank you Young for opening up to me like that. ((hugs)).

Posted by: Lauren Michele Aug 21 2006, 06:24 AM

offtopic.gif balloon.gif I am getting too off topic here. bye1.gif

Posted by: marilyns_firstkiss Aug 21 2006, 08:32 AM

this is kinda off topic too, but i wonder how joe stayed in love with her after everything...i mean wasn't she seeing frank sinatra at some point, and i am sure joe heard about jfk..any thoughts?

Posted by: Tara Aug 21 2006, 10:22 AM

You 've made a good point there Erin. I think when Marilyn and Joe became friends again, after she divorced Arthur, Joe was determined not to make the same mistakes as before. He knew that his jealousy and possessiveness had driven her away. After Joe and Marilyn split the first time, he saw a psychiatrist for a few months. Which was a brave thing for a man to do in the fifties, especially a man as reserved and traditional as Joe.

So, I think the Joe of 1960 was different to Joe in 1954. He still loved Marilyn, but he could see how fragile she was and he was determined not to push her, and not to judge her behaviour so harshly. When she became close to Frank, I think that hurt Joe deeply. I don't think he blamed Marilyn so much as Frank, who he had thought was his friend. Also, he felt that Frank's hard-partying lifestyle was bad for Marilyn. I don't think Marilyn loved Frank anything like as much as she cared for Joe, actually I think Frank was the one who chased her.

As for Jack Kennedy, I think that was quite a brief affair and once again, I don't think Marilyn was really in love with him. But undoubtedly she felt flattered by the president's attentions, and was excited to count the Kennedy family among her circle of friends. Of course the Rat Pack were closely linked with the Kennedys at the time, and Joe probably felt once again that she was hanging out with the wrong people, who didn't really care for her like he did.

But I think Joe felt that if he and Marilyn were to have any chance of getting back together, he would have to bide his time and just be a good friend. They weren't married, she was free to see whoever she wanted. All he could do was listen and offer his support, until she was ready to commit. It does seem that by the summer of 1962, when Marilyn's relationships with Frank and the Kennedys were deteriorating, she was growing closer to Joe again. He was talking about giving up his job and moving back to California. Maybe they could have got back together then, maybe not. But sadly he never got the chance to find out.

Posted by: marilyns_firstkiss Aug 21 2006, 11:11 PM

thanks for the response tara...we can always count on you for the amazing knowledge you have of marilyn! biggrin.gif
i still wonder though if joe did reject her even towards the end because of the fbi file statement...that she was hurt by arthur, joe, and frank...wasn't that in june of '62? i do not doubt they had a deep love for one another, but i do think he would've lost respect for her after everything...maybe thats just because i would feel that way about someone i loved, especially if they had sex with my ex best friend!
maybe you know the answer to this so i don't have to do too much research, but when did he rescue marilyn from the hospital? i know there were pics of the two on a beach relaxing...but it could have been years before '62.
also, this is off topic,,but could you possibly explain to me the theory of a fox studio murder conspiracy..
did she have an insurance policy with fox? it is strange she was rehired and then dead a couple days later.
also one of the neighbors said they swear they saw robert kennedy walk by their window,,,or that they saw three men in suits...i think i have this right...but i wonder about some studio executives...i'll give you more of my thoughts on that a little later...seeing as how i don't want to bombard you with the 100 questions milling in my head! thanks throb.gif

just enabling my email notification here blush.gif

jumpymm.gif

Posted by: rose Aug 27 2006, 05:59 PM

Tara,I really enjoy as always reading your thoughts (and information) about Marilyn's life marilynbybrandon_190.gif

I agree with youretty much on everything you wrote. I didn't know that DiMaggio had seen psychiatrist and yes,I agree it had been a big deal for a man during those days.

Posted by: Tara Aug 28 2006, 08:04 PM

Thanks Rose bye1.gif

Posted by: JanCollector Dec 25 2006, 08:46 PM

QUOTE(Paju @ Aug 15 2006, 07:04 PM) [snapback]112084[/snapback]
To answer your question, if I understood it correctly, Arthur Miller did receive information about Marilyn's death and I believe he was invited to the funeral, but he simply couldn't go. He couldn't believe Marilyn was dead, it was simply a horrible, impossible thought for him, so he couldn't force himself to go. He couldn't make himself face the fact that Marilyn had died. Joe DiMaggio and Berniece Miracle took care of the funeral arrangements. I don't think Arthur Miller was even in California at that time.


Definitely NOT the impression I got. He simply didn't care. When asked why he refused to go, he simply said, "Because she's not really there anymore."

You have to remember MM & AM's marriage ended on a bad note, and then after her death he went on to write that disparaging play about her. Bottom line is I think Arthur fell in love with what he THOUGHT Marilyn was, and after they were married he was disappointed to find out that it wasn't who she really was.

Posted by: Lauren Michele Jan 3 2007, 08:53 PM

QUOTE(JanCollector @ Dec 25 2006, 02:46 PM) [snapback]122759[/snapback]
Definitely NOT the impression I got. He simply didn't care. When asked why he refused to go, he simply said, "Because she's not really there anymore."

You have to remember MM & AM's marriage ended on a bad note, and then after her death he went on to write that disparaging play about her. Bottom line is I think Arthur fell in love with what he THOUGHT Marilyn was, and after they were married he was disappointed to find out that it wasn't who she really was.



How very disturbing to say the least.

Posted by: Tara Jan 3 2007, 09:24 PM

In some ways, I can understand why Arthur didn't go to the funeral. His wife was 8 months pregnant, his children were already traumatised by Marilyn's death. I've studied After The Fall, and personally I think it is as much of a critique of the system that exploited Marilyn and his own failure to help her. But whatever his intentions, it was hugely controversial.

Posted by: Robby Jan 3 2007, 11:18 PM

That's what I always wondered - How did Artur Miller's children react? I haven't heard a thing from them around the time of her death.

[EDIT] See my new topic in General Discussion.

Posted by: Bellatrix Jun 7 2012, 09:43 PM

First of all i'm not judge no one, but i think that A.M. has never fallen in love with Marilyn.
He took the "golden egg chicken" in the proper moment of his career.
Marilyn was infatuated for the man who change part of her life, when she was in NYC and i thought eventually marilyn had fallen in love with Miller for sure, beacuse she lived every day of her life to tried to find true love and be reciprocated.
Therefore Miller had not apology for not to be there at the funeral.

Sorry for my bad english... rolleyes1.gif i hope that someone understand me blush.gif


Posted by: mm_artiste Jun 10 2012, 04:39 PM

To a certain extent I agree with you, Bellatrix about the 'golden egg chicken' statement, but I do think that Arthur loved Marilyn.

In my opinion the period within which Arthur was 'in-love' with Marilyn burned hot and fast like a sparkler, when it goes out, it's done. Regardless of their divorce he still loved and cared for her as one does a dear friend and was affected by her death, it's just that he was the strong, silent type who rarely exposed any type of emotion. I think Joe understood the relationship between Marilyn and Arthur, probably having had many discussions with her about Arthur, and that's possibly part of the reason why Joe invited him to Marilyn's funeral.

Having been exposed to intense press coverage during their relationship Arthur probably had enough of the media and their pursuit of Marilyn (and him). Perhaps he didn't want to arouse speculation of the press regarding the status of his and Marilyn's relationship, especially after her death. I believe that, at the time, he didn't want to discuss his feelings about her with anyone in the press nor be exposed to any questions hollered at him by journalists as he arrived and left the services and LA.

I think Tara sums it up best when she wrote: "...his feelings were raw and he could not face going to a funeral, with the press there especially. We all respond to bereavement in personal and unexpected ways, and Arthur often seemed to be a man who wasn't comfortable with showing his feelings in public. Also, his new wife was due to give birth imminently in New York, and he probably didn't want his older kids to go through a very public funeral in LA. So perhaps it was better for him to stay away."

Posted by: Mezzo Jun 12 2012, 03:07 PM

From Martin Gottfried's biography on Arthur Miller:

"Monroe's New York public relations representative, Arthur Jacobs, called Miller to personally deliver the news of her death. His terse response was, "It's your problem, not mine." Jacobs replied, "Arthur, you always were a shit," and hung up. Miller didn't attend the funeral at the Westwood Village Memorial Chapel in Los Angeles, but his father did."
"Arthur didn't send flowers, either. His only recorded reaction, in a letter written to a friend, was that "The earth shocks for a moment [but] her life-death will not enlighten many." The only emotional impact her death seemed to have was in terms of his work. He would deal with the subject in his play. This is always how he expressed himself and his feelings--in place of directly experiencing emotions he conceptualized them, and the years of psychoanalysis had done little to change that. Marilyn's was the second recent death to confront him with his remoteness. He admitted he had felt no pain at his mother's death."

and:

"As for Miller's absence from Monroe's funeral, he would still be defending it a quarter of a century later. "To join what I knew would be a circus of cameras and shouts and luridness was beyond my strength . . . to me it was meaningless to stand for photographs at a stone." "

Whitehead also writes about Arthur and Inge's son, Daniel, and echoes much of what Tara has explained. Arthur was apparently elated when Daniel was born, but the next day called producer Robert Whitehead to explain that the baby wasn't right and that he was going to have to put him away. Interestingly enough, Gottfried included this in the biography, too:

"In After the Fall Inge's echo name is Holga, and Miller wrote a speech for her.

I dreamed I had a child and even in the dream I saw it was my life, and it was an idiot, and I ran away. But it always crept on to my lap again, clutched at my clothes. Until I thought, if I could kiss it, whatever in it was my own, perhaps I could sleep. And I bent to its broken face, and it was horrible . . . but I kissed it. I think one must finally take one's life in one's arms."

Posted by: mm_artiste Jun 13 2012, 04:38 AM

Wow! Perhaps I was too generous with my assumptions that Mr. Miller could be or ever was sympathetic toward Marilyn after their relationship ended. And Bellatrix really nailed it with her 'golden egg chicken' analogy.

Guess I need to do a little more research about Mr. Miller and how he conducted himself after his marriage to Marilyn. I know the results won't be of glowing declarations of love and respect but I'd like to believe he might have been affected and cared... a little. I understand he wasn't the warmest and most tender person but I'd like to believe there was a heart under those glasses and that brain. Perhaps he was just rotten and I have to accept that.

Posted by: mberton Jun 13 2012, 09:00 AM

A two-part documentary about MM and Arthur Miller on You Tube is interesting viewing. Arthur talks about his relationship with MM.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1W5X8gmD5g

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Zc5BSkYNqk&feature=relmfu

Posted by: Mezzo Jun 13 2012, 02:37 PM

Marcy, I realize that I'm quoting from the same source again and again, but Gottfried's book contains an account of Miller from October 30, 1995 that might help you understand how he was affected by Marilyn long after she was gone:

"...Miller was approached by a young man in a sweater and sport coat. His name was Baird Jones and he was a reporter for the Daily News. His assignment was to gather material for the gossip pages.
The question, to be sure, was mischievous, if now downright baiting. Miller was agreeable to a quick interview and Jones kneeled beside the table, opening a notebook. "The way we were speaking," he recalled, "no one else could overhear any of the questions or answers . . . Jones asked, "Do you ever dream about Marilyn Monroe?" He pressed on. "What kind of dreams are they?"
Miller (who later said that he doesn't answer questions about Monroe "unless some stupid jerk brings it up") suddenly brought his right-hand fist up to face level, "right by his jaw," Homes remembered. Rising from the chair, he said, "I'm going to knock your block off." in a "single moment," the reporter recalled, "his attitude escalated from quiet conversation to fighting speech. It was unmistakable -- he was coming right after me. He was going to slug me."
One thing Jones knew, he said, "the interview was over." Moreover, "this man had just become an enraged bull," and getting up from his knees he began "back pedaling." Although he expected the playwright to promptly calm down,
he started to go after me. The closer he came, the faster I back pedaled. Finally, about twenty feet from the table, he actually threw a punch, which hit me in the shoulder. He was a big guy with huge arms, and this man had a heck of a lot of power behind that punch.
. . . That Arthur Miller could lose control over a question about Marilyn Monroe, who had been dead for thirty years, surely betrayed myriad suppressed emotions. Obviously he had never resolved that relationship, nor understand his role in the public's ongoing obsession with her."

Perhaps his frustration came from the fact that people wouldn't let it go. This interaction with a tabloid reporter occurred immediately following a public tribute to Miller and his work in New York City. He had led another life, married, fathered two children, and continued to work during the thirty years since Marilyn's death. It seems as though he played the role of Mr. Monroe during his marriage to Marilyn and perhaps he felt that this type of questioning never let him escape it.

This is an interesting article from the Loving Marilyn website that discusses After the Fall. http://www.lovingmarilyn.com/miller.html.

Posted by: Bellatrix Jun 14 2012, 11:19 PM

QUOTE(mberton @ Jun 13 2012, 10:00 AM) *
A two-part documentary about MM and Arthur Miller on You Tube is interesting viewing. Arthur talks about his relationship with MM.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1W5X8gmD5g

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Zc5BSkYNqk&feature=relmfu


I've seen that documentary when Miller speak on Marilyn and your relationship rolleyes1.gif ... even now isn't convince me! not at all!!! huh.gif
In other hands i think that hi was a little bit arrogant, and When hi married Marilyn the lights went out on him (because Marilyn was more popular and maybe more interesting than his)
This is my thought...

Posted by: Mezzo Sep 10 2012, 10:50 PM

I thought this letter from Arthur to George Cukor gives us a glimpse of his care for Marilyn; it is currently for sale at Abe Books.

("Arthur") in blue ink on his personal Arthur Miller letterhead, April 30, 1960. Very good-fine (light creasing). 7 1/4" x 10 1/2"; fine, fresh (minor signs of handling). To director George Cukor: Before Monroe could star in her husband's script "The Misfits", she had to fulfill a contractual obligation to 20th Century Fox by appearing in "Let's Make Love", directed by Cukor. The film, a frothy musical comedy, is best remembered for the affair between its leading actors, Monroe and French actor Yves Montand. As he remained back east to write during filming, Miller was likely not aware of his wife's infidelities when he wrote his note thanking Cukor for his skillful management of the troubled Monroe. "I just wanted to thank you for the way you have behaved toward Marilyn. The picture, of course, is important to her and to you, but immeasurably more important are the precious days and weeks of her life which you patience and skill and understanding have made humanly meaningful for her. I have never known her so happy at work, so hopeful for herself, so prepared to cast away the worst of her doubts. You must know now some of the reasons why she is so precious to me and will understand the sincerity of my respect for you. I am at work here, but I don't know how long I'll be able to bear this bachelorhood. . ." Provenance: from the estate of George Cukor.

Posted by: nightxposed Sep 11 2012, 03:07 AM

I don't know enough about their relationship to weigh in on this topic intelligently, but I can't agree with the "golden egg" theory. Arthur Miller was already an enormously successful, Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright before he ever met Marilyn. He was considered one of the top two playwrights of his generation, with Tennessee Williams.

Posted by: Fav Sep 14 2012, 10:51 PM

QUOTE(Mezzo @ Sep 10 2012, 10:50 PM) *
I thought this letter from Arthur to George Cukor gives us a glimpse of his care for Marilyn; it is currently for sale at Abe Books.

("Arthur") in blue ink on his personal Arthur Miller letterhead, April 30, 1960. Very good-fine (light creasing). 7 1/4" x 10 1/2"; fine, fresh (minor signs of handling). To director George Cukor: Before Monroe could star in her husband's script "The Misfits", she had to fulfill a contractual obligation to 20th Century Fox by appearing in "Let's Make Love", directed by Cukor. The film, a frothy musical comedy, is best remembered for the affair between its leading actors, Monroe and French actor Yves Montand. As he remained back east to write during filming, Miller was likely not aware of his wife's infidelities when he wrote his note thanking Cukor for his skillful management of the troubled Monroe. "I just wanted to thank you for the way you have behaved toward Marilyn. The picture, of course, is important to her and to you, but immeasurably more important are the precious days and weeks of her life which you patience and skill and understanding have made humanly meaningful for her. I have never known her so happy at work, so hopeful for herself, so prepared to cast away the worst of her doubts. You must know now some of the reasons why she is so precious to me and will understand the sincerity of my respect for you. I am at work here, but I don't know how long I'll be able to bear this bachelorhood. . ." Provenance: from the estate of George Cukor.


Thankyou! I've re-read this thread and I must admit a few of the posts have made my blood boil but this first hand account, from the estate of George Cukor, speaks for itself.

Nobody really knows what he did or how he felt. If he had a very private maybe even confused grief due to the fact he was with a new family. Nobody can judge him on whether he was at the funeral or not, especially considering many points made in this thread eg his wife due to give birth, press intrusion, his children's upset etc. As I have always said, nobody knows what goes on behind closed doors and unless you are that person or very close to them it is very easy to get he wrong idea or make judgements/come to the wrong conclusion.

Posted by: CYRILPARIS Sep 17 2012, 02:05 PM

QUOTE(Fav @ Sep 14 2012, 11:51 PM) *
Thankyou! I've re-read this thread and I must admit a few of the posts have made my blood boil but this first hand account, from the estate of George Cukor, speaks for itself.

Nobody really knows what he did or how he felt. If he had a very private maybe even confused grief due to the fact he was with a new family. Nobody can judge him on whether he was at the funeral or not, especially considering many points made in this thread eg his wife due to give birth, press intrusion, his children's upset etc. As I have always said, nobody knows what goes on behind closed doors and unless you are that person or very close to them it is very easy to get he wrong idea or make judgements/come to the wrong conclusion.


I totally agree with you Fav. This is a subject too personal and intimate.

Posted by: Joan Newman Jul 24 2016, 05:42 AM

bye1.gif

August 10, 1962
Bouquet From "Arthur"

Former husbands, James Dougherty, now a police officer, and playwright Arthur Miller, were absent,
but there was a bouquet from "Arthur" and another from the Miller children, "Butch and Bobo".

 

Posted by: Joan Newman Feb 8 2018, 05:53 AM

[quote name='Joan Newman' date='Jul 24 2016, 04:42 AM' post='238847']
bye1.gif

Aug. 8, 1962, the day of the funeral of Marilyn Monroe, his second wife. “Instead of jetting to the funeral to get my picture taken I decided to stay home and let the public mourners finish the mockery,” Miller wrote. “Not that everyone there will be false, but enough. Most of them there destroyed her, ladies and gentleman.” Credit A

 

Posted by: Stacy Feb 8 2018, 09:22 AM

Butch and Bobo were the names of her parakeets

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