Follow ES on Twitter


Boards rules & guidelines | Help | Search | Members | Calendar


Welcome Guest Log In. This is a private community that no longer accept new registrations.



Search on ES with Google :

> Read before you post anything

May 6th 2005 : NEW RULES!

Before you start to post here, please remember that this is the place to ask only questions related to a photo or photographer, dates or events etc. It's not the right forum to post requests for/like

- bigger sizes
- without the watermark
- more from this session etc.

Those (for example) belong to the "Pictures Requests" subforum.

4 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 >  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Roxbury Second House
Share |
Mezzo
post Nov 28 2009, 01:45 PM
Post #41
Everlasting Star


Group Icon

Posts: 1 206
From: USA
Gender:
Real Name: Mary

Joined: 19-July 08


Thanks, Nettie! I guess that means the house is considerably changed since Marilyn's time there, then.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Joan Newman
post Nov 28 2009, 05:43 PM
Post #42
Daisy


Group Icon

Posts: 4 761
Gender:
Real Name:

Joined: 29-September 02


I guess this is what the "current" look of the house should be after the fire.

In picture 1 it reads:
QUOTE
arthur_miller_bought this farmhouse in 1956 and rebuilt it after a 1983 fire (taken from Architectural Digest, November 1995).
I want this Architectural Digest article !!!

Picture 2 with Rebeca in 1995, must be a seperate building, maybe Inge's photo studio, matches the color of the long brown building with the round end you mentioned earlier, picture 3.

In the 2001 movie Plain Jane, scenes filmed in the house, you see this brown building, picture 4.

YES ?
 
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Joan Newman
post Nov 28 2009, 11:25 PM
Post #43
Daisy


Group Icon

Posts: 4 761
Gender:
Real Name:

Joined: 29-September 02


deleted small image
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Mezzo
post Jan 14 2010, 12:56 AM
Post #44
Everlasting Star


Group Icon

Posts: 1 206
From: USA
Gender:
Real Name: Mary

Joined: 19-July 08


I stumbled across some information on the home that Frank Lloyd Wright designed for Marilyn and Arthur in Roxbury. The plans were originally designed for a family in Texas but the home, a 7000 square foot structure named Crownfield, was never built. In 1952 a member of the Mexican government asked Frank Lloyd Wright to design a home to be built for him on the cliffs of Acapulco Bay. Wright modified the Crownfield plans to suit the building site and needs of the family. However, after the death of the family's young son, the plans were again set aside. In 1957 when Marilyn approached Wright about plans, he once again redesigned the Crownfield plans to suit the Roxbury site, adding a pool. In 1993 Taliesin Architects adapted Wright's original plans once again, enlarging the structure to 74,000 square feet and building the King Kamehameha Golf Club located at 2500 Honoapi'ilani Highway, Wailuku, Hawaii. The modified plans retained the large central domed room and the radiating barrel vaulted wings, which now contain meeting rooms, kitchens, a private dining room, locker rooms, an employees' lounge and golf cart facilities.

Here is one photo of the finished structure:
Attached File frank_lloyd_wright_design.jpg ( 13.94K )Number of downloads: 124

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Mezzo
post Jan 14 2010, 02:53 AM
Post #45
Everlasting Star


Group Icon

Posts: 1 206
From: USA
Gender:
Real Name: Mary

Joined: 19-July 08


QUOTE(Nettie @ Nov 28 2009, 04:25 PM) *


Thanks for the photos, Nettie. The low wall must be the one that Marilyn wanted; its installation proved fatal to the nearby trees when their roots were cut through.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Mezzo
post Dec 17 2011, 03:08 PM
Post #46
Everlasting Star


Group Icon

Posts: 1 206
From: USA
Gender:
Real Name: Mary

Joined: 19-July 08


QUOTE(Nettie @ Aug 25 2008, 07:18 PM) *
I am really interested in her homes, etc. I keep longing for more pictures of them. (IMG:http://www.everlasting-star.net/boards/style_emoticons/default/bye1.gif)


From http://wanderlustinct.wordpress.com/
"Following the narrow path of Tophet Road, pre-independence era stone walls guide and mark the rolling homesteads and farms.

Perched atop a lovely green and wooded hill lies the home of Arthur Miller, and during their marriage, Marilyn Monroe. The quaint cottage is shaded from the winding road, and lies within the depths of Litchfield County, on what feels like a private corner of the world. And these among other reasons are probably what this famous couple loved so much about the estate. After their marriage in 1956, the two escaped New York City hustle and bustle for Roxbury, CT and their country home."

Attached File Screen_shot_2011_12_17_at_7.21.36_AM.png ( 1.06MB )Number of downloads: 127


From
"In 1956, Miller married screen diva Marilyn Monroe; the couple divorced in 1961, just 19 months before she died of a drug overdose. Miller's daughter, Rebecca, from a later marriage, is married to actor Daniel Day-Lewis and is listed on land records as owning 49 acres of land on Tophet Road worth about $1.3 million.
Miller's estate contributed about 47 acres to the Roxbury Land Trust."
Attached File Screen_shot_2011_12_17_at_7.25.48_AM.png ( 438.85K )Number of downloads: 131

Attached File Screen_shot_2011_12_17_at_7.42.14_AM.png ( 483.56K )Number of downloads: 117


Read more: http://www.newstimes.com/news/article/Roxb...p#ixzz1gnYCswac

From http://www.locationary.com/place/en/US/Con...p1002588063.jsp
Contact Info
Address 232 Tophet Rd, Roxbury, Connecticut, United States
Postal Code:
06783-1517

From http://www.connecticutbarns.org/45557
"Building Name (Common)

Captain David Leavenworth Homestead
Building Name (Historic)

Captain David Leavenworth Homestead
Address

232 Tophet Road
Roxbury
Typology

English
Tobacco Shed
Other Shed

Historic Significance

Architectural description:
Barn I:
The western half of the west block of this L-shaped barn is almost certainly the oldest section and may have originated as a tobacco barn. It has a dirt floor, which suggests it was not used for cows, and is notable for a spacious interior with a high roof and single-span beam.

The barn stands on the east side of Tophet Road, to the north of the small board-and-batten barn. The c. 1770 house on this property stands to the south. Features include: 26 x 50, 26 x 60; peak-roofed barn consists of two elongated blocks arranged in an L-plan. The west block is oriented with one gable to the west and intersecting at its east end with the north end of the east block; western part of the west block is probably an old English barn (now clad in drop siding), which has been elongated to the east (that part is clad in board and batten); a pair of rolling doors is centered on the south elevation of this block, which has a standing seam roof; shed addition to north; concrete block base; interior is framed with hewn timbers; dirt floor. The east block of the L-shaped barn has an asphalt shingle roof and is clad in board and batten; west side frames the barnyard; on the east side a two-part shed-roof addition runs from the south gable end to a shingled silo at the northeast corner of the barn.

Barn II:
The barn stands on the east side of Tophet Road, to the south of small board-and-batten barn. The c. 1770 house on this property stands to the south. Features include: 28 x 24; peak-roofed barn stands with gable ends to the east and west; shed-roofed wing extends to south; south elevation has two sets of hinged doors; scattered windows (6-pane sash); fieldstone foundation; wood frame; board and batten.

Historical significance:
The tobacco barn, or shed as it is called in the Connecticut River Valley, is one of the most distinctive of the single-crop barns. They tend to be long, low windowless buildings with pitched roofs. They are characterized by vented sides and roofs to regulate air flow and allow harvested tobacco to cure at the appropriate rate. Derived initially from the design of the English barn, the shed is composed of a fixed skeleton consisting of two- or three-aisle bents repeated at intervals of 15 feet to the desired length. The wood-framed bents sit on piers of stone or concrete and the bents are connected by girts and diagonal braces. Typically there are one or two door openings at each end, making the shed a "drive-through," although some sheds are accessed through doors on the sides. The interior structural framework serves a second purpose in addition to supporting the walls and roof of the building; it provides a framework for the rails used to hang the tobacco as it cures.

The oldest barns still found in the state are called the "English Barn,” “side-entry barn,” “eave entry,” or a 30 x 40. They are simple buildings with rectangular plan, pitched gable roof, and a door or doors located on one or both of the eave sides of the building based on the grain warehouses of the English colonists' homeland. The name “30 by 40” originates from its size (in feet), which was large enough for 1 family and could service about 100 acres. The multi-purpose use of the English barn is reflected by the building's construction in three distinct bays - one for each use. The middle bay was used for threshing, which is separating the seed from the stalk in wheat and oat by beating the stalks with a flail. The flanking bays would be for animals and hay storage.

The term dairy barn is used as early as the 18th century (along with “cow house”). Modern dairy barns are characterized by their interior arrangements of stanchions and gutters to facilitate milking and the removal of manure. In some cases this is just a few stalls in the corner of a barn, in others it can be a large barn dedicated to that single purpose.

A shed is typically a simple, single-story structure in a back garden or on an allotment that is used for storage, hobbies, or as a workshop. Sheds vary considerably in the complexity of their construction and their size, from small open-sided tin-roofed structures to large wood-framed sheds with shingled roofs, windows, and electrical outlets. Sheds used on farms or in industry can be large structures.

Field Notes

Information from a survey of Roxbury by Rachel Carley.

The c. 1770 house on this property is attributed to Capt. David Leavenworth, and the farm was in Leavenworth hands for much of the 19th century and again in the 20th century. In 1949, the same year he wrote Death of a Salesman, the playwright Arthur Miller (1915-2005) purchased the property, and it remains in his family. A portion of the barn was reportedly a studio for Inge Morath (1923-2002), a noted photographer who married Miller in 1962.

Former CT residence of Marilyn Monroe"
Attached File Screen_shot_2011_12_17_at_7.53.44_AM.png ( 1.33MB )Number of downloads: 137



Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Mezzo
post Dec 17 2011, 03:38 PM
Post #47
Everlasting Star


Group Icon

Posts: 1 206
From: USA
Gender:
Real Name: Mary

Joined: 19-July 08


I found some more photos inside and around the house on the magnum website.

This is dated 1962, and there is Marilyn's Hugo:
Attached File Screen_shot_2011_12_17_at_8.22.00_AM.png ( 139.92K )Number of downloads: 154


This is dated 1963. I wonder if it is the hammock Marilyn bought:
Attached File Screen_shot_2011_12_17_at_8.20.41_AM.png ( 170.98K )Number of downloads: 136

From p.318, "Timebends":Attached File Screen_shot_2011_12_17_at_8.31.14_AM.png ( 50.98K )Number of downloads: 142


Dated 1962, in Marilyn's Roxbury laundry room:
Attached File Screen_shot_2011_12_17_at_8.22.27_AM.png ( 144.85K )Number of downloads: 168


The Roxbury kitchen, 1963 and Arthur's study, 1965:
Attached File Screen_shot_2011_12_17_at_8.21.03_AM.png ( 186.07K )Number of downloads: 189
Attached File Screen_shot_2011_12_17_at_8.23.16_AM.png ( 171.25K )Number of downloads: 166




Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Joan Newman
post Dec 17 2011, 04:14 PM
Post #48
Daisy


Group Icon

Posts: 4 761
Gender:
Real Name:

Joined: 29-September 02


(IMG:http://d2eae8pjw8pj4b.cloudfront.net/boards/style_emoticons/default/jumpymm.gif) (IMG:http://d2eae8pjw8pj4b.cloudfront.net/boards/style_emoticons/default/jumpymm.gif) (IMG:http://d2eae8pjw8pj4b.cloudfront.net/boards/style_emoticons/default/jumpymm.gif) (IMG:http://d2eae8pjw8pj4b.cloudfront.net/boards/style_emoticons/default/jumpymm.gif) (IMG:http://d2eae8pjw8pj4b.cloudfront.net/boards/style_emoticons/default/jumpymm.gif)

Oh Mary (IMG:http://d2eae8pjw8pj4b.cloudfront.net/boards/style_emoticons/default/bye1.gif)

I just woke up and even though it's Christmas, not in a very happy mood (IMG:http://d2eae8pjw8pj4b.cloudfront.net/boards/style_emoticons/default/huh.gif) Just one of those days.

Got out of bed and there was your post in one of my favorite threads. Thank you, thank you, thank you (IMG:http://d2eae8pjw8pj4b.cloudfront.net/boards/style_emoticons/default/clapping.gif) (IMG:http://d2eae8pjw8pj4b.cloudfront.net/boards/style_emoticons/default/clapping.gif) (IMG:http://d2eae8pjw8pj4b.cloudfront.net/boards/style_emoticons/default/clapping.gif) .
I love the new pictures of the house with the wall in front. But have never seen the barn picture. And all the information (IMG:http://d2eae8pjw8pj4b.cloudfront.net/boards/style_emoticons/default/ohmy.gif) I haven't read it all carefully yet but the specifications are confusing to me. Wish I had someone t explain it all so I can picture it all better. I've seen several pictures of Inge and Miller in the house but never with Hugo. That makes me sad. Marilyn loved him so and we have so many beautiful pictures of them together even in NY. I hate that she died and Inge got to keep living with him, but I do understand. I am sure Arthur adored Marilyn at the time they were married but at the end she probably drove him nuts. Being married to Marilyn Monroe was very unsettling. Life with Inge was certainly more his style. They definitely had much more in common. They were 2 very different woman.

But thank you for the super interesting post. I have to sit and soak it all in better. Let me go have breakfast first. Thanks for jump-starting my day Mary (IMG:http://d2eae8pjw8pj4b.cloudfront.net/boards/style_emoticons/default/bye1.gif)
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Paju
post Dec 17 2011, 06:03 PM
Post #49
♥ Appleblossom ♥


Group Icon

Posts: 3 998
From: Finland
Gender:
Real Name: Sirkku

Joined: 4-August 02


Thank you so much! The Roxbury house looks beautiful and it's so great to see some photos inside the house (IMG:http://www.everlasting-star.net/boards/style_emoticons/default/smile1.gif)
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Mezzo
post Dec 17 2011, 11:12 PM
Post #50
Everlasting Star


Group Icon

Posts: 1 206
From: USA
Gender:
Real Name: Mary

Joined: 19-July 08


You're welcome, Netti and Sirkku. This topic is endlessly fascinating to me.

Nettie, I've been inexplicably blue lately, too. I am happy that the info and pictures may have cheered you.

From the description of the barn pictured (Barn I in the article) it is north of the house, pictured below:
Attached File Screen_shot_2011_12_17_at_3.58.02_PM.png ( 461.29K )Number of downloads: 115


This post has been edited by Mezzo: Dec 17 2011, 11:15 PM
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Shine84
post Dec 18 2011, 04:36 PM
Post #51
Marilyn nut


Group Icon

Posts: 64
From: Germany
Gender:

Joined: 26-January 11


thanks u for your research, I´ve soaked it all in, in the last hour. What a beautiful place and how quiet it must be there. (IMG:http://www.everlasting-star.net/boards/style_emoticons/default/wub.gif)
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
zeldazonk61
post Mar 26 2012, 07:33 AM
Post #52
Marilyn addict


Group Icon

Posts: 182
Gender:

Joined: 19-February 12


I find those photos rather heartbreaking. All her dreams for having a family were in that house. The hammock, Hugo etc. and there Arthur is enjoying it all with Inge Morath. It a bit shitty really.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Fav
post Mar 27 2012, 07:34 PM
Post #53
Everlasting Star


Group Icon

Posts: 3 072
From: UK
Gender:

Joined: 7-April 03


It's life though isn't it. Some things work out and some don't for lots of reasons. Me, I think I'd want to move to get new memories somewhere else but I know plenty of people that don't see things that way. It's just down to the individual and their circumstance. I don't think those photos were intended as a gloat. I don't know what the thought was behind them and what article they may have featured in but I doubt there was any ill feeling behind them.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Joan Newman
post Mar 27 2012, 08:59 PM
Post #54
Daisy


Group Icon

Posts: 4 761
Gender:
Real Name:

Joined: 29-September 02


I'm torn between feelings. I think Arthur was so miserable towards the end of their marriage that he just had to feel so happy to find a new life, joy again. Remember, he totally blocked out ALL feelings for his son that was put away in that hospital.

I personally would want to start fresh somewhere else. Like he did after leaving his 1st wife, he sold that house and got another even though in same town, street, whatever. But I think he truly loved this house, the land, (even though it was Marilyn who bought it for him out of her own money). I know it was the one thing that he kept going back to when he was stressed with life. It brought him peace. And so I see that too. It seems kind of insensitive to me to see them pose in the exact house maybe, but I really think he was totally over with any feelings for Marilyn at the end.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
mberton
post Mar 27 2012, 09:17 PM
Post #55
Marilyn encyclopedia


Group Icon

Posts: 558
From: Australia
Gender:
Real Name: MB

Joined: 1-August 11


I agree with you Nettie that Arthur was miserable at the end of the marriage and must have felt relief to find a new life. I have read that he loved the Roxbury house - it was his sanctuary - and it is a beautiful house. But MM and Arthur must have had some happy memories there too. There is no doubt that Marilyn continued to have an impact on Arthur's life and influenced his playwriting right up to his own death (dare I say it, even profit from their relationship). I'm sure he reflected on their marriage often through the years and knowing her as he did, understood her demons. Personally, I think he continued to have feelings for MM because he wrote so much about her in his work.

Are the photos with MM at Roxbury?

Attached File 24326383.jpg ( 26.2K )Number of downloads: 119

Attached File 24326372.jpg ( 72.56K )Number of downloads: 124


This post has been edited by mberton: Mar 27 2012, 09:41 PM
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
zeldazonk61
post Mar 28 2012, 04:55 AM
Post #56
Marilyn addict


Group Icon

Posts: 182
Gender:

Joined: 19-February 12


Yea i agree in that the marriage was over and they were all over the drama. Still I know if I was a third wife (the fact that she was marilyn aside) i would want to change the decor a bit. Its really odd that its all still the same. Its the hammock more than anything...I think if she had been a live to see that photo with him and the daughter she couldn't have in the hammock, it would have devastated her.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
ginie
post Mar 28 2012, 12:27 PM
Post #57
Everlasting Star


Group Icon

Posts: 1 629
From: France
Gender:

Joined: 29-May 11


what home ?

in 1952 from http://topics.nytimes.com/topics/reference...ller/index.html
Attached File Miller_topic.jpg ( 28.06K )Number of downloads: 111


in 1987 from http://forward.com/articles/111977/view-fr...e-of-posterity/
Attached File arthur_miller_081309.jpg ( 88.62K )Number of downloads: 116
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Joan Newman
post Mar 28 2012, 08:30 PM
Post #58
Daisy


Group Icon

Posts: 4 761
Gender:
Real Name:

Joined: 29-September 02


The first house had to be 155 Willow St Brooklyn Heights as it says here he owned it in the early 1950's.



The second house was the house he lived in with Marilyn because he owned it until his death.



Attached File(s)
Attached File 181807363_a387d63749_b.jpg ( 257.39K )Number of downloads: 103
 
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Mezzo
post Mar 29 2012, 02:30 PM
Post #59
Everlasting Star


Group Icon

Posts: 1 206
From: USA
Gender:
Real Name: Mary

Joined: 19-July 08


Yes, Nettie, I think you're right about the 1952 photo. Here's another one, which identifies the location as his home:
Attached File Screen_shot_2012_03_29_at_8.25.39_AM.png ( 260.96K )Number of downloads: 129


The following from the New Yorker, online, and refers to the first home Arthur owned in Roxbury. Interestingly enough, the article was accompanied by a photo of Arthur and Marilyn in her T-Bird.

Attached File Screen_shot_2012_03_29_at_8.06.28_AM.png ( 216.16K )Number of downloads: 107

Photograph by Paul Schutzer/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images.

March 1, 2012
WALKING WITH ARTHUR MILLER
Posted by John Lahr
Read more http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/cult...l#ixzz1qVjpzUHj

"At some point during the afternoon, Miller, Morath, and I drove over to forty-four-acre plot Miller had bought with the profits of “All My Sons,”situated on the corner of Tophet—the hottest part of hell in the Old Testament—and Gold Mine. We walked up behind the main house, to the knoll where the cabin nestled in a thicket of birch trees.
MILLER: In those days, I didn’t think this hill was quite as steep. I always thought I was walking on pretty flat ground. I have memories here. I kind of enjoy seeing it and thinking, Gee, I really did something there.
MORATH: I’m so glad I’ve seen it. I didn’t know it was so tiny.
MILLER: It’s six by ten. I’ll tell you about the windows. I didn’t know how to make windows, how to frame them. I was in town, and there were two young carpenters, itinerant carpenters. I met them in the grocery store. And we got talking. I said, “Would you guys frame out some windows for me?” So they came up here, and they did this in a day. Made the window frames. You can take out the windows in the summertime. It’s all open. See, this whole thing lifts out.
MORATH: There’s no electricity up here now.
MILLER: I had it—electricity must have come out from the house. I learned a lot building this place. See, the big problem was getting the rafters of the roof up there alone. See that triangle? I finally built it on the ground, then swung them up. Until I confronted the issue, I had no idea how I was gonna do it—a bit like writing a play, you know. You get to a certain point, you gotta squeeze your way out of it.
John Lahr’s essay on Arthur Miller, along with a profile of Mike Nichols, who is directing the current Broadway revival of “Death of a Salesman,” appear in his book “Show and Tell: New Yorker Profiles” (Overlook Press)."

Here is an exterior shot of the studio at Miller's first Roxbury home, from http://www.shedworking.co.uk/2007/09/arthu...lers-shed.html:
Attached File Screen_shot_2012_03_29_at_8.12.01_AM.png ( 116.2K )Number of downloads: 96

"Arthur Miller's shed
In 1948, Arthur Miller built a white clapboard cabin in Roxbury, Connecticut, specifically as a base in which to write Death of a Salesman, even though he had never built anything similar in his life (he said the hardest part was putting up the roof rafters by himself). As he built, he put together the play in his mind, although he did also make use of his desk, an old recycled door. Here he is pictured above in a photo with slighly unsettling perspective taken by Inge Morath. More details about the shed and the play in a great, but quite long, article by The New Yorker's John Lahr here."

More information on Roxbury, and a description of the area by Arthur himself, from http://www.nytimes.com/2005/02/20/nyregion...ty/20CONN.html:
"EARLY a half-century ago, on the property in Roxbury he had bought with his wife, Marilyn Monroe, Arthur Miller seeded a pine forest. A stand of some 6,000 trees now rises formidably on the land behind the farmhouse on Tophet Road, which was built in 1769, and where Mr. Miller, who had lived there since 1958, died on Feb. 10.

...This life among celebrities surely informed the autobiographical plays about Marilyn Monroe (that he always denied were autobiographical) "After the Fall" and his final, touching work, "Finishing the Picture," that seemed to indicate he was still struggling with his role in her life and death.

But when Mr. Miller first moved to Roxbury in 1947 - it was in a shack he had built on the property of his first house on Tophet Road that he wrote "Death of a Salesman" and "The Crucible" - the area had yet to lose the air of the Depression, "when small, bony farms still covered the landscape," as he wrote in his autobiography, "Timebends." Even then it was an artist's haven - the sculptor Alexander Calder was a neighbor - but though the farms were dying off, he wrote, for the next decade and into the 1960's, "the area still wore its pleasing air of relaxed rural decay.

The writer Tom Cole (best known for his screenplay for the movie "Smooth Talk") bought that first house on Tophet Road from Mr. Miller, and the two men subsequently became fast friends, taking almost daily walks."

Another photo of the second Roxbury home, ca. 1958:
Attached File Screen_shot_2012_03_29_at_8.56.58_AM.png ( 253.43K )Number of downloads: 129



This post has been edited by Mezzo: Mar 29 2012, 03:03 PM
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
mberton
post Mar 29 2012, 08:47 PM
Post #60
Marilyn encyclopedia


Group Icon

Posts: 558
From: Australia
Gender:
Real Name: MB

Joined: 1-August 11


Another of Roxbury with Miller and Morath.

Attached File 6306504178_d154451b2b_b.jpg ( 127.92K )Number of downloads: 132
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

4 Pages V  < 1 2 3 4 >
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 21st August 2019 - 04:04 PM
This Marilyn Community is sponsored by:


Marilyn Emoticons and all Marilyn related icons and buttons © Brandon Heidrick 2003-2009, Twitter icon by IconTexto.com
Avatars contributed by : Paju of Love Marilyn, Nina of Marilyn Online, Marloes of Marilynfan.org, Faith of starleticons_, Jeharsy, Ariane, and Missy.
Header image by Marina.