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> Roxbury Second House
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Mezzo
post Sep 13 2008, 01:27 PM
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Back to the Roxbury addresses, on this website you can see videos taken in Roxbury: http://www.itnsource.com/compilations/ente...m/?lr=S03050701

Clip #22 was taken on February 7, 1956.

Clip #21 is dated June 28, 1956. It also shows a street sign for Old Tophet Road. Marilyn and Arthur hadn't yet bought the second home in Roxbury. The video shows the home with the arched front porch.
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Joan Newman
post Sep 13 2008, 08:57 PM
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QUOTE(Mezzo @ Sep 13 2008, 12:27 PM) *
Back to the Roxbury addresses, on this website you can see videos taken in Roxbury: http://www.itnsource.com/compilations/ente...m/?lr=S03050701

Clip #22 was taken on February 7, 1956.

Clip #21 is dated June 28, 1956. It also shows a street sign for Old Tophet Road. Marilyn and Arthur hadn't yet bought the second home in Roxbury. The video shows the home with the arched front porch.



(IMG:style_emoticons/default/cheekkiss.gif) (IMG:style_emoticons/default/cheekkiss.gif) (IMG:style_emoticons/default/cheekkiss.gif)

Oh mary. Thank you Thank you Thank you.
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Mezzo
post Sep 13 2008, 09:14 PM
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QUOTE(Nettie @ Sep 13 2008, 02:57 PM) *


You're welcome. (IMG:style_emoticons/default/bye1.gif)
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Mezzo
post Sep 14 2008, 12:56 AM
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Ah ha! I've found this in a new thread, and am comparing it to one of chris' first picture posts in this thread:

Arthur Miller home
Attached File roxbury_first_house.jpg ( 4.5K )Number of downloads: 15


Do you think the French windows are the same in this photo???
Attached File post_258_1221341964_thumb.jpg ( 5.68K )Number of downloads: 18


See the following thread for more Roxbury photos, taken at Arthur's home. (Not the one he and Marilyn bought together.)
http://www.everlasting-star.net/boards/ind...ic=14681&hl=
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Mezzo
post Jun 26 2009, 09:27 PM
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This is an old topic, but it still interests me and I found something more on it in Christopher Bigsby's new biography on Arthur Miller.

The photo showing Arthur smiling and holding a cigarette and a newspaper, his right foot resting on some construction materials or the edge of the porch, in front of the second Roxbury house, is included in the book with the caption,
"The Roxbury house, which Miller bought with Marilyn Monroe and lived in for the rest of his life."

Marilyn's piano is mentioned with regard to her Roxbury home:
"In 1956 it was shipped across the country to the house in Roxbury, Connecticut, that she and her husband had bought and reconstructed in the expectation of a happy married life."

I'll post Bigsby's references to the homes that Miller owned in Roxbury:

"On 29 June, the day Miller had chosen for a press conference which the couple hoped would buy them some limited freedom, they drove, with Morton Miller (who had lived on Goldmine Road in Roxbury since 1950) at the wheel, from the Welton Road house in Roxbury that Miller had bought in the winter of 1947, to Westchester County, New York, to acquire a marriage license."

Following the completion of The Prince and the Showgirl in November 1956 and Marilyn and Arthur's two-week trip to Ocho Rios, Jamaica,
"Miller and his wife now moved between their new apartment on 57th Street, with a room off the vestibule for May Reis, Marilyn's secretary inherited from Elia Kazan, and a summer home in Amagansett, on the southside of Long Island. Miller's old home in Roxbury had been bought by the critic John Aldridge (later it would be sold on to fellow playwright Tom Cole), Miller now looked for a new one, sometimes taking his son Robert with him."

"He [Miller] was asked for a written account of his present attitudes, all of which he reported to his lawyer in a letter dated 10 June 1957, in which he also explained that he had just bought two hundred acres of land with a farm in Roxbury where they were to make a home. He hoped, he said, to raise bloodhounds that could scent a subpoena at a thousand yards and eat the person carrying it."

Following Marilyn's miscarriage at Amagansett on August 1, 1957, Marilyn and Arthur were interviewed in New York for an article in Look magazine.
"Marilyn said: 'His work will always be at the centre of our lives' but that she would 'keep working too', while he described their new Roxbury home as 'the place where we hope to live and die'.

"They now retreated to their new Roxbury home, close to the property he had owned with Mary and where he had written Death of a Salesman. They had looked at a number of places, including some in New York State, before, with the help of Morton Miller, they settled on the Leavenworth homestead in Tophet Road, then a nondescript farmhouse set in 110 acres. They took joint titoe, with Morton as witness, and set about renovating it, even employing Frank Lloyd Wright whom Marilyn had met at the Plaza Hotel where he lived, to produce designs. Marilyn's own plans were grandiose, Miller's altogether more modest and practical. There was, Morton observed, a tension between 'Marilyn's lack of concern for money' and 'Arthur's frugality.'

She wanted a swimming pool, prhaps somewhat redundant given the existence of a natural spring two hundred yards from the house which was later the basis for a pond where Miller was to swim every summer for nearly fifty yeras, but her ideas were based on the Hollywood she had, for a time, left behind. More than four decades later what were to have been the changing rooms for this pool are still visible, though now no more than sheds for garden tools."

"At first, the very business of creating the house in which they were to live brought them together. It was in desrepair and still contained remnants of those who had been there before. Marilyn suggested installing sliding doors for the main room and hunted through nearby stores for cupboards and fittings. Now, each day was punctuated by the sounds of carpenters, plumbers and electricians. But the worm was already in the apple. In an undated poem whose refrain is 'When we began', Miller reflects, in the opening stanza, on the renovation of a house and the beginning of a marriage, speaking of a time when no window would open, the doors were stuck and the floors were bent. Then, as the house was reconstructed around them, they had lain together, happy as mice. Three years later, with the house in perfect order, they lay apart, dreading the return of day, the marriage collapsing. In the final stanza the marriage is over."

"Marilyn relinquished all rights to the Connecticut house. In volume 30 of the Roxbury Land Records is declared: 'KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS: THAT I, MARILYN MONROE MILLER...for divers good causes and considerations...have remised, released and forever quit-claimed...unto the said Arthur Miller...all such right and title...to the lands, premises and property situated in...' This marked the final gesture of a marriage that had begun to founder within weeks of being contracted.

This post has been edited by Mezzo: Jun 26 2009, 11:38 PM
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Joan Newman
post Nov 10 2009, 08:27 AM
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(IMG:http://www.everlasting-star.net/boards/style_emoticons/default/ohmy.gif) I can't sleep, it's 2:30 am. Have we posted this before? Could this be Marilyn and Arthur's Roxbury house, now owned by his daughter? Is that their pond? Are these his 6,000 pines ?

http://virtualglobetrotting.com/map/daniel...view/?service=1

Doesn't the house next door look like the house Arthur is at in this picture?

I also found an article "My Lunch with Arthur Miller" in which he shows a photo of Arthur's house, What do you think of it ?

http://thebarksdalebuzz.blogspot.com/2007/...hur-miller.html
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Mezzo
post Nov 10 2009, 02:28 PM
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QUOTE(Nettie @ Nov 10 2009, 01:27 AM) *
(IMG:http://www.everlasting-star.net/boards/style_emoticons/default/ohmy.gif) I can't sleep, it's 2:30 am. Have we posted this before? Could this be Marilyn and Arthur's Roxbury house, now owned by his daughter? Is that their pond? Are these his 6,000 pines ?


Haha, Nettie, that sounds just like what I do when I can't sleep at 2:30 AM, too!

From your globetrotting link, I clicked on Google Earth. The home is highlighted there, and it is captioned the same as on Virtual Globetrotting: "Actor Daniel Day-Lewis and his wife Rebecca Miller owns this house. This was also the final home of playright and essayist, Arthur Miller."

Bing Maps shows the home's location on Tophet Road:
http://www.bing.com/maps/default.aspx?v=2&...1&encType=1

I think the building with the round room that you have pictured is one of the property's outbuildings. It seems to be very large for a shed, but I wonder if this is the building that Marilyn had constructed for the changing rooms for the pool she wanted? If you look at it from a different angle on the virtual globetrotting site, it seems that it was originally constructed as a long, low building with the round room tacked on and an even larger addition added later.

This picture from the article is interesting:
Attached File Arthur_Miller_house_Roxbury.jpg ( 12.47K )Number of downloads: 96

If you change the view on the globetrotting page, it looks like the photo could have been taken on the west side of the Miller house, with the additional (round-roomed) building located to its left, or north.

Good finds, Nettie!


This post has been edited by Mezzo: Nov 10 2009, 02:45 PM
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Mezzo
post Nov 10 2009, 05:39 PM
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Here is a link to an article regarding the donation of a portion of Arthur and Marilyn's property to the Roxbury Land Trust:
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=...78976&rfi=6

There is an innacuracy; the author indicates that Miller wrote "Death of a Salesman" in a studio he constructed on the Monroe/Miller Tophet property, but the play was actually written in a studio Miller himself built on the Welton Road property he owned with his first wife, Mary Slattery (Welton Road reference taken from Christopher Bigsby's biography of Arthur Miller.) The property was sold in 1958, when he and Marilyn purchased the farm on Tophet Road. We know that Marilyn also had a studio constructed at Tophet Road for Arthur's use.

Googling "Welton Road Roxbury Connecticut Arthur Miller" I come up with a home that is being sold at 26 Welton Road; this property is adjacent to 232 Tophet Road:
http://www.realestatebook.com/homes/listin...628935-ls/39-t/

The photo that has been posted of Arthur's first home in Roxbury shows a low hill in front of the house; I wonder if this is where Marilyn had the low brick wall that upset her when, later, the trees there died because their roots had been cut for the wall's installation. This home at 26 Welton Road shows a low brick wall in front of it, too. This may be a real stretch, but I wonder if it could be Arthur's first Roxbury property? The structure of the main building seems proportional and the windows are spaced the same as in the photo that Chris posted.



This post has been edited by Mezzo: Nov 10 2009, 11:58 PM
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Mezzo
post Nov 10 2009, 08:35 PM
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Nope, my mistake. I found the most recent owner of Arthur's first Roxbury home, the playwright Tom Cole. His address at the time of his death in March 2009 was 153 Tophet Road, Roxbury. I presume his wife, Joyce Chopra, still lives in the house. Nevertheless, it is not 26 Welton Road - so, no picture connection! Tom Cole and Arthur were very good friends.

Here is a link to a map showing 153 Tophet Road, Arthur's first house; 232 Tophet Road, Arthur and Marilyn's house; and 26 Welton Road, which is nearby but was never owned by Arthur Miller.
http://maps.yahoo.com/broadband/index.php?...0road%20roxbury
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Mezzo
post Nov 11 2009, 12:03 AM
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From the New York Times, February 20, 2005; authors Elizabeth Maker and Bruce Weber:

"NEARLY a half-century ago, on the property in Roxbury he had bought with his wife, Marilyn Monroe, Arthur Miller seeded a pine forest. A stand of some 6,000 trees now rises formidably on the land behind the farmhouse on Tophet Road, which was built in 1769, and where Mr. Miller, who had lived there since 1958, died on Feb. 10.

Mr. Miller, who was 89, had been receiving hospice care at the Manhattan apartment of his sister, Joan Copeland, but knowing the end was near, he requested an ambulance ride back to Roxbury. His last days were spent in the downstairs study of the four-bedroom clapboard house, where he could look through the windows and see the trees he planted on land that now spans 350 acres in Roxbury and Woodbury.

''My father's foremost intent and hope was that he could get back home before he died; that he could drink a last sip of Roxbury water, breathe a last breath of Roxbury air,'' said Robert Miller, a film producer, whose mother was Mr. Miller's college sweetheart and first wife, Mary Grace Slattery. ''He had the biggest smile on his face when he arrived. He was very gracefully trying to let go, and coming home was the completion of it for him. He sort of scripted the last week or so of his life. It came out exactly as he would have written it.''

For those who know Mr. Miller only as readers or theatergoers, it may be hard to reconcile the urban intellect that created such works as ''Death of a Salesman,'' ''A View from the Bridge'' and ''The Price'' with this view of him as at home in a rural setting. He was a sequoia in the literary world, but it is probably true that only those who knew him thought of him as a lover of the land, a planter of trees, a man who took solace and peaceful pleasure in evergreens.

''You know, people can talk all they want about the genius of Arthur Miller, but we never paid attention to that,'' said the actor Richard Widmark, 90, a Tophet Road neighbor since 1968. ''He was just my best buddy down the road. We were just two country boys interested in tractors and mowers and the land.''

Indeed, as home to Mr. Miller longer than any other place, Roxbury -- he first moved there in 1947 -- might rightly be said to have the strongest claim on the playwright's perspective. And as counterintuitive as that might seem, the experiences that he had there demonstrably informed his work. The fact is that if his work was almost always grave in its bedrock moral seriousness, it was also remarkably diverse in setting and tone. So was Mr. Miller's demeanor. He had, as many of his friends recalled, a surprisingly puckish wit and a huge desire to laugh. He also -- who knew? -- liked to sing.

''He was a closet crooner who dreamed of his own lounge act,'' said the playwright A.R. Gurney, who has lived in Roxbury since 1983. ''I was at his house about three months ago, and someone was playing 'Georgia on My Mind' on his grand piano. Arthur started singing, and we all sat down and listened. He was excellent.''

Litchfield County has become, of course, something of a celebrity refuge, a place where the wealthy can disappear in colonial backwoods, the gentry can call their long-fallow fields farmland and colorfully clad bicyclists can challenge themselves on the long hills whose narrow roads don't carry much four-wheel traffic other than the odd Mercedes convertible. You have to have money to live in Roxbury, and especially in later plays -- like ''The Ride Down Mt. Morgan'' about a wealthy bigamist who has become morally reconciled to his grossly selfish behavior; and ''Resurrection Blues,'' about the nexus of power, money and television, in which a Latin American dictator hires an American television crew to film a crucifixion -- the savage humor derives from a disdain of the kind of affluence that creates privilege without responsibility.

Mr. Miller himself was hardly immune to the trappings of wealth and fame; you couldn't expect otherwise from a man who lived with Marilyn Monroe. When the couple first moved to the farmhouse, they planned to raze it and build another house on the property, and Ms. Monroe contacted Frank Lloyd Wright to design it. (Mr. Miller put the kibosh on the plan, after Wright produced a frivolous, prohibitively expensive design that included a circular living room with a dropped floor and a domed ceiling, and a swimming pool built into the side of a hill that ''would require, I judged,'' he once wrote, ''heavy construction on the order of the Maginot Line.'')

In later years, Mr. Miller often played tennis at Dustin Hoffman's house nearby with Mr. Gurney and others, and his friends' recollections were dotted with boldface names. The writer Frank McCourt, who also lives on Tophet Road, recalled a croquet tournament.

''Arthur was my wife's partner, and Mia Farrow was my partner,'' Mr. McCourt said. ''Well, Mia and I were going like gangbusters, but Mia suddenly missed this simple shot, and they won. And she said, 'Oh, I'm sorry, I just got so distracted gazing at Arthur. What a handsome man!'''

This life among celebrities surely informed the autobiographical plays about Marilyn Monroe (that he always denied were autobiographical) ''After the Fall'' and his final, touching work, ''Finishing the Picture,'' that seemed to indicate he was still struggling with his role in her life and death.

But when Mr. Miller first moved to Roxbury in 1947 -- it was in a shack he had built on the property of his first house on Tophet Road that he wrote ''Death of a Salesman'' and ''The Crucible'' -- the area had yet to lose the air of the Depression, ''when small, bony farms still covered the landscape,'' as he wrote in his autobiography, ''Timebends.'' Even then it was an artist's haven -- the sculptor Alexander Calder was a neighbor -- but though the farms were dying off, he wrote, for the next decade and into the 1960's, ''the area still wore its pleasing air of relaxed rural decay.''

The writer Tom Cole (best known for his screenplay for the movie ''Smooth Talk'') bought that first house on Tophet Road from Mr. Miller, and the two men subsequently became fast friends, taking almost daily walks.

''You'd usually find Arthur in his old woodsman's shirt, faded jeans, an old work hat,'' Mr. Cole said. ''He spent quite a bit of time trying to invent a bird feeder that could foil the squirrels.''

The disconnect between the turbulent work and the easeful setting in which it was written brings to mind Wordsworth's famous dictum: ''Poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings; it takes its origin from emotion recollected in tranquility.'' But it's also true that the country life was hardly absent from Mr. Miller's work.

For one thing, Mr. Miller was an accomplished carpenter, which is useful as a metaphor for his playwriting. As many critics have pointed out, his plays were meticulously built. But it was literally true, too. He was handy. Among other things, he built that writing shack at his first Roxbury house, as well as the back staircase on the home of William and Rose Styron, neighbors for four decades. And he was also a decent mechanic. These were skills he honed early on in his life, in Brooklyn, and in many of his plays he celebrated them as undervalued by society. After all, one way of looking at the downfall of Willy Loman, the famous salesman, is that he had nothing to show for his work; he built nothing, created nothing.

But this philosophical strain was present in Mr. Miller's work from the beginning. His first play, ''The Man Who Had All the Luck,'' which died after four performances on Broadway in 1944 but which was successfully revived by the Roundabout Theater in 2003, was set in rural Michigan. (Mr. Miller became a writer not in New York, but in the Midwest; he attended college at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, where he won his first accolades.) It's about a man who is handsome, personable, charming, decent and self-aware, but essentially without useful skills. Still, it is he -- not the deserving auto mechanic, not the hardworking athlete, not the schooled breeder of mink -- who survives calamity and achieves wealth and security for his family.

Roxbury and Michigan may share some rural qualities, but New England is not the Midwest, and more than half a century in Connecticut certain qualifies Mr. Miller as a New Englander. Even though a native New Yorker, he had the craggy mien and -- in public, anyway -- the often forbidding demeanor of a chill Yankee.

He also had a spine, the kind of rectitude that New England has claimed as a signature since the days of Cotton Mather. The painful probity of his work -- the acknowledgment of the inevitability of moral failure and the anguish that results from the grave mistakes of good men -- seems descended in a direct line from Hawthorne. Nowhere is this clearer than in ''The Crucible,'' in which John Proctor, a beacon of honor in Hawthorne's own town of Salem, Mass., is put to death because he cannot lie about his own sin.

The play was literally about the Salem witch trials, but symbolically about the insane Communist-purging campaign of Senator Joseph McCarthy and the House Un-American Activities Committee. Mr. Miller, called before the committee in 1956, famously declined to name names of those with whom he had attended Communist-sponsored meetings in 1947.

In Roxbury, Mr. Miller had an especially close ally named Jacqueline Dooley. In his book, ''In the Country,'' which he wrote in 1977 with his third wife, the photographer Inge Morath, Mr. Miller recalled that one night Mr. McCarthy had gone on television and challenged anyone to say he had spoken a lie. And soon came the news, Mr. Miller wrote, ''that a Mrs. Dooley of Roxbury, Conn., had fired off a telegram to demonstrate that the senator had indeed told some lies. It was the sole response from the people of the United States.''

Mrs. Dooley, now 84, said this week that the McCarthy era cemented their friendship.

''That's why Arthur and I were so close,'' she said. ''Just because he had progressive ideas and dared to question authority, they called him a Communist. What he was was deeply devoted to moral responsibility and social justice. He also happened to be a great friend: no airs, no hidden agenda, just a real nice, down-to-earth guy.''

She could as well have been describing John Proctor of Salem as Arthur Miller of Roxbury."



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Joan Newman
post Nov 11 2009, 01:16 AM
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Wow 'Mezzo' (IMG:http://www.everlasting-star.net/boards/style_emoticons/default/mf_w00t1.gif)

Tons of info ! Let me suck it all in. Thanks.
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Mezzo
post Nov 11 2009, 01:26 PM
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You're welcome. It's amazing what you can learn when you google. (IMG:http://www.everlasting-star.net/boards/style_emoticons/default/biggrin.gif)
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Joan Newman
post Nov 13 2009, 04:01 AM
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EDITED Never mind Mezzo. I went to Timebends and it says the Calder's lived about a mile away. I still don't see how he could make that statement though.
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Mezzo
post Nov 13 2009, 04:00 PM
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QUOTE(Nettie @ Nov 12 2009, 09:01 PM) *
Mezzo (IMG:http://www.everlasting-star.net/boards/style_emoticons/default/bye1.gif) I have a question?
In Martin Gottfried's biography abour Arthur, he writes, "Early in 1958 they found the Connecticut property they had been looking for, an old farm with a mailing address of 323 Tophet Road, not far from Miller's old place." He goes on, stating that in 1958 Arthur, "...told Architectural Digest, dormer windows were being added and the roof was being raised to allow for an extra guest bedroom. As he [Arthur] wrote to his Irish pal, James Stern,
We've been remodeling the old Ray Leavenworth house which is...within view of the [Alexander and Louisa] Calders. I have a fine little studio [twelve feet by fourteen] apart from the house with a fireplace and an electric heater and windows all around."

If you have the time, look at this website:
http://the-mobile-factory.blogspot.com/200...rs-roxbury.html

Read where the Calder's home is located,
306 Painter Hill Road Roxbury Connecticut
How come Arthur states here that he is "within view" of their house. If you google it it seems impossible. I was just wondering.

EDITED Never mind Mezzo. I went to Timebends and it says the Calder's lived about a mile away. I still don't see how he could make that statement though.


Nettie, this is just the type of thing that interests me. I noticed the address in Gottfried's book, too, and after finding all sorts of documentation stating that the home Arthur and Marilyn bought was, in fact, located at 232 Tophet Road, I can only guess that Gottfried either made an error or he deliberately changed the address to 323 to fool people who might bother to go to Roxbury for photos and the like.

Look at this map on mapquest: http://www.mapquest.com/maps?1c=Roxbury&am...inter+Hill+Road

Traveling by road from 306 Painter Hill Road to 232 Tophet Road, you would cover 1.4 miles. As the crow flies, it would be about 2400 feet, or about one-half mile. Maybe the topography of the area allows for the properties to be in view of each other. If 306 Painter Hill Road is a hill and is elevated this could be true.
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Mezzo
post Nov 13 2009, 06:39 PM
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I've just found the street address for the summer home in Amagansett. The home is now owned by Joseph and Lucy Kazickas of Rosehip Partners and Lucy's Whey; its address is 5 Hamlin Ln, Amagansett, NY 11930.

Here is a link to an aerial photo of Hamlin Lane; I don't know which house is #5. From what I've read of the home now, it is over 4500 square feet and has a pool. Click on #2 and you can zoom in to have a view of Hamlin Lane.
http://www.bing.com/maps/default.aspx?v=2&...1&mkt=en-us

Here's a link to a blog by someone who stayed in the home:
http://blogs.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseact...logId=413045678
I wish there were some pictures.

Google Maps pinpoints a home at 5 Hamlin Lane; just zoom in and you can see it.

This post has been edited by Mezzo: Nov 13 2009, 06:43 PM
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Joan Newman
post Nov 13 2009, 06:41 PM
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Makes sense about the topography. Thanks again Mezzo. Did you know these 2 others who were neighbors?

http://virtualglobetrotting.com/map/frank-...view/?service=1

http://virtualglobetrotting.com/map/richar...s-house-former/
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Mezzo
post Nov 13 2009, 07:22 PM
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Thank you, Nereida. I did know that they had been neighbors, and Richard Widmark played tennis with Arthur on his court at 232 Tophet Road. I hadn't looked at photos of their homes, though.

It looks like Hamlin Lane is very private, just as you say. As the home is so changed and is, of course, privately owned, maybe you could just soak up the atmosphere and catch a glimpse of the oaks that Marilyn and Arthur loved. Of course, if you get there, you just might see Alex Baldwin playing on his basketball court! It looks like a lovely, bucolic, expensive neighborhood! It might be fun to walk through the town, too. Look on the Dan's Hampton's website/blog and search for Marilyn Monroe and you'll find some information about the places she frequented when she was there.
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Joan Newman
post Nov 15 2009, 05:18 AM
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I was referring to the Roxbury house neighborhood being very private but I see from your site that so is the Hampstons. I don't care to go to the Hampton rented cottage though. Wow, it has tripled in size it says. I see the Baldwin house is close to the Hamlin house http://virtualglobetrotting.com/map/alec-baldwins-house/.
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Mezzo
post Nov 15 2009, 03:46 PM
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QUOTE(Nettie @ Nov 14 2009, 10:18 PM) *
I was referring to the Roxbury house neighborhood being very private but I see from your site that so is the Hampstons. I don't care to go to the Hampton rented cottage though. Wow, it has tripled in size it says. I see the Baldwin house is close to the Hamlin house http://virtualglobetrotting.com/map/alec-baldwins-house/.


Oops! Yes, I think the Roxbury neighborhood is also very private. I've just read that the pines by the house are the ones that Arthur and Inge planted when she was pregnant with Rebecca; not knowing she was pregnant, she and Arthur lugged the seedlings uphill for several hours. Despite the fact that I resent her a little for being the wife that followed Marilyn and for allowing her son to be institutionalized, I think she was a strong, interesting woman.
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Joan Newman
post Nov 16 2009, 03:17 PM
Post #40
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Hi Mezzo (IMG:http://www.everlasting-star.net/boards/style_emoticons/default/bye1.gif)

THE REGION; Fire Hits Home Of Arthur Miller

AP
Published: May 3, 1983

A fire this morning heavily damaged the home of Arthur Miller, the writer. Mr. Miller and his wife, Inge Morath, were not in the house on Toplet Road when the fire started, at about 9 A.M.

They are in Peking, where Mr. Miller is directing a production of his play ''Death of a Salesman,'' according to Eileen McMahon, a press agent.

The Roxbury Fire Chief, Gary R. Adams, said Miss Morath's mother was in the house but was uninjured.

Chief Adams said the fire started in the basement and crept up to the second and third floors through heating ducts. He said it had probably started accidentally; the exact cause is under investigation. ''There were flames everywhere when we arrived,'' he said. ''It took approximately two hours to get it under control.''

The house, purchased by Mr. Miller in 1957 while he was married to Marilyn Monroe, sustained ''between $50,000 and $100,000 in damages,'' according to Chief Adams.

http://www.nytimes.com/1983/05/03/nyregion...hur-miller.html


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